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Breaking the 3-Hour Barrier My Story

Breaking the 3-Hour Barrier, Part 10

    Well that only took forever.

    Akron crushed my spirits like no other marathon had before. I felt physically ready to go well under three hours, and I was dying to prove my current capabilities. Realistically at that point, I didn’t even need every little thing to go right to get under three – to at least be done with the “Breaking the 3-Hour Barrier” thing. But I didn’t. I wasn’t even close. Though I knew I was capable, WOULD I ever?! All of my future goals seemed hopeless. Kyle pulled up my face and said “I believe in you.” I broke down with the realization that I wasn’t sure if I believed in me anymore.

    I took a week off with low, easy mileage then tried my best to stay focused and not give up. I tried to tell myself that big disappointments like that were bound to happen because part of truly understanding and conquering the marathon is getting crushed over and over again and learning how to overcome the mistakes.

    Though the hip pain I had during the race was due to changing shoe brands and quickly went away, it was still unilateral, which means that side needed a little extra TLC. I decided to try out a sports doctor who did dry needling and developed knee pain shortly after that. I couldn’t pinpoint the real cause of it, but knew it was probably due to unraveling muscle tension. We thought it was the IT band, but it was sticking around and not getting better. I was told to run through the pain, but I couldn’t get all my mileage in. I had gotten two solid weeks of training done, but now a month out from race day, I was struggling to put in the work before taper time. Then I got hit HARD with a cold and that took me out for a week. I know it doesn’t sound that long, but for me that’s a long time to be sick. I can usually kick something like that in about 12 hours. Maybe the extra down time would help my knee? Nope. It made it worse (with muscle tension stuff a lot of times not moving makes things worse). Now I was desperate. I didn’t know if I could even finish a marathon, let alone run a personal best.

    Kyle and I were heading to San Diego to spend Thanksgiving with his family. At this point, I couldn’t run a mile without pain. My last ditch effort to fix this thing was my old acupuncturist. He has crazy good knowledge of the human body and in the past I responded well to his trigger point acupuncture. I made a last minute appointment and he informed me it was actually the vastus lateralis that had a few spots of scar tissue built up in it. So after the needles, he scraped that out (yes, it hurt a lot). I was so sore after, but knew instantly that it was going to be okay. The next day I ran 13 miles pain free, along with the rest of the taper.

    With renewed hope, race weekend was here. I didn’t get in the training I wanted, but I had experience on my side, and I was so relieved to get to the starting line pain free. So what was I going to do now? I could stick with the 3:00 pacer and just focus on getting under 3:00, even if it would just be 2:59. Maybe I could go for my goal time at Akron, which was supposed to be a 6:25/mile pace. OR, I could just chase the 2:45 pace group and do my best to hang on to the pack. It’d be risky because I didn’t think my fitness was there to hold on for the whole race and it’d probably mean hitting a wall hard and maybe not even finishing under 3:00. But WHAT IF…

    Race morning was one of the smoothest ever for me, having everything planned, getting where I needed to be, having the right nutrition, and wearing enough throw off layers. I really only had to wait around at the start for an hour, which isn’t bad compared to the big races like Boston and New York. The weather looked like it was going to remain perfect as we all crammed into the starting chute. I looked down to see a sea of nothing but Nike 4% Vaporflys. I had to chuckle. The elites and seeded runners were off and we followed right behind. I went out at what felt like tempo pace, but ignored the buzzes on my watch. The 5k clock put me at 19:32, which was well under 3:00 pace. I didn’t care, I was still going for it. Then just after mile 4, my knee started to hurt. WHAT?! It had been totally fine, but I guess with the low mileage week of taper, there was still some tension in the surrounding muscles that needed work. The pain wasn’t bad, but I knew that since it started this early it was going to get pretty ugly. Now I definitely had to keep pushing to try and bank as much time as I could. At the 10k I was at 38:58, and the 15k 58:55. The 2:45 group was still in my sights, but it was time to let them go. The pain reached another level. I told myself to just get to the half and then reassess. I reached that point at 1:23:23. That was enough right? I thought it was. Now I just needed to focus on 6:50s. Anything less than that I could bank. Mile 14 was when I first looked at my watch for the split – 6:33. I felt like I was running so much slower than that. Alright, just get through mile 16. The pain kept getting worse. Should I drop out? No, I wasn’t giving this one up without a fight. After mile 17, my knee started to buckle and I told myself to pull it together and get through 20. Miles 18-20 were 6:51, 6:45, 6:54. Was that enough? What did I need? I figured I could still pull it off with 7:15s for the last 10k.  So I focused on that, one mile marker at a time. I got through mile 23 and looked at my watch time. I was going to make it! Even if I did 9 minute miles the rest of the way, I was going to break 3:00. Focus! Mile 26 was my slowest at 7:30. I made the final turn to the finish and saw 2:55 on the clock. That was so worth it. I was so happy that I didn’t quit. Even though it wasn’t my goal time, I FINALLY broke 3 hours, qualified for some free entries next year, and am able to move into Chicago’s ADP for 2019. Oh man, my knee hurt so bad.

    Yes, I AM happy with my performance. It was a big positive split, but I don’t regret running it that way. It’s what I needed to do in those circumstances. I’m glad I could experience the course, with all it’s rolling hills. I was a little bummed that I didn’t get to run with a pack (there wasn’t much with 2:45 group ahead and 3:00 group behind), but I guess I’ll look forward to that at Chicago. I was also sad that I didn’t really get to race it either. The last 10k in the marathon is where you usually get to see some race magic happen, but as the runners kept passing me I just had to keep focusing on not stopping.

    On to the next segment of “My Story!” It’s called 2020 Vision (you have NO idea how long I’ve been waiting to use that one…because I also have horrible eyesight).

    Final Stats

    Time: 2:55:16

    708th of 7832 overall

    190th of 3644 female

    48th of 532 age group

     

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